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charter schools that aim to be the model-ts of education. >> america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and wit
education and remembering general norman schwarzkopf. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: the u.s. economy has dodged a potentially crippling strike at ports up and down the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. wall street finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. toda
this stuff also about the educational stuff like the policy-making situations which i'm very interested in. it's a great thing washington, d.c. has all these things and c-span has covered it. >> c-span created by america's cable companies in 1979 luft. >>> president obama meets with house and senate leaders from both parties this afternoon at the white house that meeting is scheduled for 3:00 eastern in the oval office. politico rights leader's side is hopeful there will be a breakthrough on preventing the tax increases and spending cuts scheduled to take effect on january 1st. earlier today senator tom harkin held and even outside of the capitol about the fiscal cliff. he called it a battle for the middle class. we will also hear from congressman chris van hollen and members of advocacy groups. >> are we ready? okay. good morning. all right. good morning. welcome to this cold morning press conference here outside of the senate office building. i am the executive director of network and i am one of them on the bus. we're here to continue the message, grizzlies to find a solution to the eco
to grow up. i feel like if you do these little things, in the education system from sixth grade through 12th grade every year -- everyone knows who george washington is, but you should have a class every year that allows you to live in a better neighborhood and allows you to buy a home, and giving people a credit, and allows them to get a car with a low-interest rate. guest: a real problem in american education is we are no longer in a position to require high personal standards. good example, when i was in college, i got a piece of paper when i was a freshman, i went to a state teachers college in new york state, wonderful institution. they said we expect our students and i read with to endure to my personal standards or we will throw you out of here. that's basically what the paper said. that then filters down. we don't have that anymore. instead we hear about people come from different backgrounds and different cultures. i came from different backgrounds and a difficult to prevent him from an italian immigrant family in new york city. my father was aborted or salesman. his father was a
as a way to afford a college education, but the real education she received was in iraq where on march 23rd, 2003, her convoy took a wrong turn and was ambushed by iraqis, she was captured and became the first american p.o.w. to be successfully rescued since world war ii. >> on april 1st, 2003, a special army special forces, rescue jumpers, army rangers and navy seals landed in iraq. the mission, to take home jessica lynch. they entered the hospital where she was being held, and found her. >> where do the windows go out to? >> it's okay. >> lynch was suffering from mental distress and severe physical injuries, including several broken bones. within seven minutes of the first american boots hitting the ground, lynch was on a helicopter headed for much needed medical attention. after nine days in captivity, her nightmare was over. >> you're doing wonderful, okay? >> welcome back. >> her rescue-- (applause) >> indeed her rescue launched the news coverage and she was a hero. she says she's not going to take credit for something she tonight do and survived herself simply as a survivor. would yo
the country observed a moment of silence for the 20 children and 6 educators. today there is a walk for peace in newtown, and three more children will be laid to rest. ana grace marquez-green, who lost to count and sing. josephine grace gay, who celebrated her 7th birthday. and emilie alice parker. lots of backlash for the nra for their statement friday. gabby and i are extremely disappointed by the nra's defiant suppose. they could have chosen to be a voice for the own members who want common sense, reasonable safeguards on deadly firearms. but instead it chose to defend extreme pro gun positions that aren't even popular among the law-abiding gun owners it represents. the national rifle association is speaking out on the massacre, saying the answer is to deploy armed guards at schools. and they're not the only ones joining the debate. >> columbine. >> virginia tech. >> tucson. >> aurora. >> ft. hood. >> oak creek. >> newtown. >> newtown. >> newtown. >> newtown. >> how many more? >> how many more? >> how many more colleges? >> how many more classrooms? >> how many more movie theatres? >> how
prevention. we also believe parents need to be educating their kids and talking to kids about appropriate sexual behaviors to assure all of the young people in philadelphia are prepared when they think about having sex for the first time. we believe that our role is to assure that as partners for parents, we provide what young people may need if they're going to act responsibly in terms of sexual relations. >> you talk about education and i just want to throw out numbers. 25% of new hiv infections in philadelphia alone are teenagers. 15% of philadelphia students say they weren't taught about hiv or aids in school. some might argue maybe more education might be the answer, not condoms. >> we don't think it's one or the other. we think most are important. we're including education not only in schools but also include the internet and we're providing condoms as we've been doing now for more than a year in a number of locations throughout the city for young people. >> let's talk a little bit about the program. tell me a little bit about how it will work, because the part that i sort of took t
with literacy. that is a problem with education. there is an inevitable path of increasing sophistication, the amount of information that people can process and the amount of narrative complexity that people can process. it is on an increasing curve. >> i know you are an optimist. >> i am optimistic. look at television in 1968 versus or television is today. look at what the cbs evening newscast from 1974 versus what is happening today. it has become more politicized. the ability to process information has grown. these are issues of education. >> [inaudible] >> right. it is now more obvious. >> there is ongoing battle globally. people are putting out ideas. various ways, hidden or not, and value systems for these arguments. that is going on all the time. every single person involved on whatever level in our industry is putting something out there. obviously, you have to take responsibility for it. you try to work out exactly -- you join in a battle. someone else is saying probably the opposite. you have to get in there and do it. other people will not stop and you have to do battle with th
educated middle class on one camp and the so-called islamists and majority of the illiterate part on the other side. that's not the way we expected after the uprising. we need a charter that unifies people that not talking about controversial issues like role, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, freedom of worship but talk about science, technology, health care, that is what people compare about. we are going through difficult time that the economy is falling apart, standard and poor downgraded us to a d minus. not in the greatest shape. we need to see a way to move forward. but it is difficult time right now. >> ifill: but if these numbers hold, it looks like pretty significant victory for the muslim brotherhood, was this silent majority that was speaking? >> i'm not sure it's a silent majority. you have islamists which is probably like 30% of the country the rest are as you know, one-third of the country is illiterate. they are being told that this is stability. i think they have right to think that way. going through turbulent time for two years, if you tell them this
. that is why my children are staying right here. >> it is a rumor that is depriving children of an education despite the fact that doctors in the camp have not found a single case of tb. the family has a new neighbor. three days ago, he fled with his wife and children to jordan. for now, they have to live in a tent until there is a container for them. the temperature is sometimes below freezing. it is very tough. >> we have children and it is terribly cold at night. i have asked for more blankets, but they told me i had to wait. >> her eldest son wants to leave the camp. he received death threats after an argument. stranded without any prospects for the future, frustration can easily turn into violence, but the security forces will not let him out. the jordanian government wants to prevent syrian refugees from going underground. meanwhile, aisha is terrified the violence of the syrian civil war could spread to the camp. >> i want to leave. my children and i want to go home. >> but she knows, and so do her children, that there is no going back. >> in the united states, house speaker john boeh
of chicago where my firstborn started his education. the school is an american rainbow, african, polish, mexican, croatian, indian, you name it it's there. they're all gathered at the christmas pageant, the three-year-olds are standing on the rickety stage gleefully parading about in the santa hats. my son is talking to his friend lisa, the chinese girl with a white mom and the pakistani and. i am cooing in the air of our newborn baby when the signal comes and the class starts in on their assigned some. it's a little wobbly at first but they catch the swing soon enough, and when they hit the chorus i can't help myself. i start to sing along. i love this melody. i love the sight of my sweet kid among all these other sweet kids. i'm remembering the sheer all i felt him at first sight in a redwood forest, the adrenaline pumping through my veins when inhaled my first taxi on the new york island. my sons will make their own memories on this blessed patch of earth. one day, they will realize just what it means that this land is their land, and that they share with 310 million others. when my
. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a la of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood! ♪ grr! hi, neighbour! grr! i'm daniel tiger, and this is tigey! grr! we're playing jungle! (chattering) want to play? put on your binoculars like this. ooh! there's my jungle
they're nuclear now, the next has to oneat that is welly educated in what is happening otherwise we will end up with muchween bigger benghazi proble. lou: imagine the constitutional referendum tomorrow. it will take some time for that to fully develop with support for president morsi's judgment for what it should look like. will he prevail, will h hear the end of the process possessed the powers he claimed for himselfocf meco for which he has since relinquished? >> unfortunately my answer will be, yes. president morsi of egypt has maneuvered,e need to go and get a strong message of note to the referendum but the other part of the opposition saying we want to boycott, so now they are divided, the result will be the muslim brotherhood, government of egypt will be most likely win this referendum. on the other hand the opposition is very strong in egypt, the return to the previous situation, so what i suggest the future is morsi will try to establish a referendum state in a very strong opposition for months and months for the regime innt egypt.nths lou: as we wrap up, professor, russia
educational assessment project. what's the goal of the test? >> the test was an assessment of how much our students know about our u.s. history at grades 4, 8, and 12. everything from the united states constitution to presidents to why certain laws came into play. at very different levels, there are certain questions that are asked. the 8th graders really were the ones who did, i would say, perform the best when we consider the 4th and we consider the 12th grade. >> that's because 8th graders' scores improved over the last time the test was given. 4th graders and 12th graders did not. in fact, a majority of 12th graders turned in a poor performance. their questions were harder, and their correct answers were fewer. 55% of 12th graders scored below the basic level. what does this show? >> mm, lauren, that's not good news at all. [ chuckles ] and what does that mean for our 12th graders? it means that we have to find a way to engage our 12th graders in learning u.s. history. we have to make it more important to them. so, we have a lot of work to do, definitely, at the 12th-grade level. >> th
could get teared apart. for educational purposes we want to come on the know to teach people about these crew kre tours for a serp reason. >> it looks like a cat and part bear. >> 90% of people have never even a bear cat. >> next we have a palmsiva. the droppings are used to fert lies droppings. >> he eats the coffee bean. it goes through his stomach and intestines and they take it and bake it for $500 a pounds. it is supposed to be medicinal. in sars, this is the animal that caused the sars disease. this is a delicacy in asia. they use the fur and the scent glands for perfume. but it loved to eat cobras as well. he could eat a king cobra. when a cobra strikes he goes like this. and you can predict it. this animal comes down on the ground and walks around the cobra and all of a sudden the creature runs around the cobra and the co are is trying to follow him and gets so dizzy and he falls over -- it's funny but not funny for the cobra. >> that's unbelievable. >> he goes around in circles until he is so dizzy. >> he knows how the do that. >> the palm civet. this animal here, is one y
on educational programs. >> we have taken this approach but it comes at a cost. state cost. when you talk about loss of supporting programs for music, arts. >> reporter: parents aren't sure it is a price they want to pay. the proposal is being met with mixed reviews. >> my suggestion is no guns for everybody. >> the guns aren't the issue. it is the people having the problems. >> people with guns around our kids is not helpful and sends the wrong ideas to the kids. >> reporter: officials can't imagine how they would expand it to all 50 schools in the district. ann rubin, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> oakland a's owner wants to keep the team in town for another 5 years and he sent a letter to the authority that over sees the home field, asking for a lease extension. the team is still looking for a new venue. jean quan pledged to work with the team. >>> oakland public lieraries will shut down -- libraries will shut down till january 2. books and other materials don't need to be checked in till january 4. it is due to budget cuts. >> reporter: windy and wet and it comes at a busy time. what we Ño >>> b
. it is money that could be spent on educational programs. >> we have taken this approach but it comes at a cost. state cost. when you talk about loss of supporting programs for music, arts. >> reporter: parents aren't sure it is a price they want to pay. the proposal is being met with mixed reviews. >> my suggestion is no guns for everybody. >> the guns aren't the issue. it is the people having the problems. >> people with guns around our kids is not helpful and sends the wrong ideas to the kids. >> reporter: officials can't imagine how they would expand it to all 50 schools in the district. ann rubin, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> oakland a's owner wants to keep the team in town for another 5 years and he sent a letter to the authority that over sees the home field, asking for a lease extension. the team is still looking for a new venue. jean quan pledged to work with the team. >>> oakland public lieraries will shut down -- libraries will shut down till january 2. books and other materials don't need to be checked in till january 4. it is due to budget cuts. >> reporter: windy and wet and it comes
education and basic training programs we can help -- lift the congolese army up and get them closer to the standards we want to see in the military, i want to stress that is still a relatively modest investment of our money and time. we find we're able to get a fairly large return on that investment in terms of the output. it is no secret that if we were to seek further defense cuts -- see further defense cuts, we would have to take a close look at all of these. even as modest as the expenditures countrurrently are. >> give that some thought, and if you could get back to us with the record on that, and pull together the best you can the dollars that we're spending. are they adequate? give us some idea of apartheid station. we of got to look at all of that in the grand -- the total spending. >> i would like to ask the panel what you feel like with regard to m23, their ultimate aims. do you feel like they're a threat is subsiding, or it is possible that could lead to a new regional war? >> i will take that question. the m23 is basically a rebel group. how they believe that the terms o
and access control and training for students and educators alike that the group said could be tailored by any school to suit its needs. harris? >> harris: if people were anywhere near their computers or tv's today they saul duling news conferences all over the place with people on different sides of gun control debate appearing. but then they didn't seem to be anywhere near a compromise. >> no, harris. and president obama released a video message today vowing to fight nor new gun laws early next year. the contours of this debate are already taking shape as leading democrats press for a renewed assault weapons ban and for new limits on semiautomatic ammuniti magazines. a leading senate democrat says she favors schools being allowed to have armed guards if they so choose but then she then cited the columbine massacre. >> in fact, there were two armed law enforcement officers who twice engaged the shooters at columbine. that didn't prevent 15 from being killed and 23 wounded. >> however, opponents of the assault weapons ban being proposed say that law was in effect when columbine occurred and fa
the gang problem or gun problem in chicago. law enforcement is not going to fix the educational system or the poverty rate or any of those other things. >> get closer to home now. it's starting to get late, boys. >> reporter: one thing we noticed on our ride-along, the amount of children on the streets after dark. 34 kids have been killed in the violence this year alone, including 7-year-old heaven sutton, who was shot in the head while selling candy in her front yard. >> juveniles are the ones getting shot. we got to get them home. that's where the parents can help us a lot. >> quite frankly, we need the parents to step up a little built more and take ownership, sincerely of their children, and raise them a little bit better. >> stay here. >> reporter: at one point, they pull over two men driving a car with illegal tail pipes. >> got a license? >> reporter: they approach with caution and get them out you. they end up being clean. no gang tattoos, just two young men out trying to have a good time. the men may feel like they're being harassed. they say it's a part of the job. >> overall
north korea. a few people are getting out and educating the world about what ordinary life in north korea is like. about the concentration camps there and the oh lit cal prisons where three generations of a family can be imprisoned for so called political crimes and how the regime uses food as a weapon for ordinary people just to keep them in line and control them. >> greta: how do they know it is even better outside north korea to even go there? that is what i never understood. they are there and don't know figure. how do they know to go anyplace? >> this is something else that s happening thanks to the people who have escaped. think about it. if you are an immigrant to any country the first thing you want to do is let your family and friends know that how you are doing in your new home and what things are like there and so, too, the few north koreas who have gotten out are finding ways to get information back to north korea. you can't send a letter. you can't make an ordinary phone call. you can't sent a text message or an e-mail so what do they do? they hire cor couriers who walk
that are on the top are states that educate their young people, states that have taken the issue of obesity and exercise very seriously. the states on the bottom tend to be poorer states but that is not mutually exclusive because you have states like oklahoma and alabama, who have actually moved up in the rankings. so the issue is one of education. accessibility to the better foods, supermarkets coming into neighborhoods. for instance, in certain neighborhoods, there's really a lack of green groceries and mrs. obama has shed a lot of light on that subject, to our credit. and i think that was we go along and we come to understand these are very expensive issues, i mean, obesity costs us $190 billion a year. that is an incredible amount of money, and the other way to look at it is, we use about 1.1 billion gallons, extra of gas lane, owing to obesity. 1% of the gasoline we use is related to obesity. >> heather: it is just not mon taylor, that it is costing. it also costs us in lost time and also lost productivity. >> exactly. but the real problem with obesity is childhood obesity. and we have
think we know what to do? >> i think there's a lot that could be done. it involves education, it involves investing in infrastructure which we should be doing and, frankly, i think all of that would take time. the best thing we can do to make up for the $750 billion a year whole in labor compensation that has arisen because of technological change is ring as much of the waste out of health care as possible. workers take home pay suffers by that amount. >> i had health care written down here and that was the elephant in the room we didn't talk about when we talked about government spending right now. i know peter has worked on it really hard. but something that is really sad for me looking forward about the u.s. economy is a lot has been done. i think even morally, it's terrific that americans are going to be covered. but the system hasn't really been rationalized and that is a big drag on the u.s. economy. >> i think there is much more progress that is being made, not just because of policy, but because insurance firms are pushing this way and insurance firms are pushing this
. host: at any time take after his father whether he would study classical education, becomes? guest: when he was five or six he was writing his only little history of medieval warfare. i stayed back. we played a wonderful video g e game, age of kings. it is very -- you build your own castles and that was -- i let little play it as much as he wanted to. he took to reading and he loves histo faulkner. he is a reader. so, i just stand back because he will go wherever he goes. host: go back there. what about the 1980's. what work did you do then? guest: at a certain point after factories and bar tending my father had been an employee, the japanese with call him a company man in a small manufacturing company outside of boston and he had moved from sales manager to vice president to president without any equity. my brother and i both worked there in high school in the factory. the company made steams valves and heavy iron castings for steam traps on oil lines or submarines. it was lit manufacturing but -- light manufacturing but dirty, dusty. that is what our summer jobs consisted of. my
is at st. john's in annapolis, loving it. >> he does not take after his father -- a classical education, books? >> when he was five or six he was writing his own histories of medieval warfare. i stayed back. we played a wonderful video game, age of kings. you build your own castles and -- i let him play as much as he wanted to. he took to reading. he loves history, faulkner, he is a reader. so i just stand back. he will go wherever he goes. >> what about the 1980's -- what kind of work did you do then? >> at a certain point, after factories and bartending, my father had been an employee at a japanese company and outside of boston. he had moved up to vice president to president with no equity and a share stock. my brother and i had worked there in high school in the factory. the company made steam valves and big heavy iron casting for steam traps on oil lines or submarines. it was light manufacturing, but dirty, dusty, and that is what a summer job consisted of. my brother is older -- he came out of the army and went in as jr. purchasing clerk. sometime in the late 1970's i had had an of
cnn's 2009 hero of year for bringing education it to mani manila's street children through mobile push cart classrooms. he hopes to be an inspiration it to others. >> i'm representing the street children to give them hope. >> he's one special boy. you may remember one of the 2011 nominees for the children's peace prize, malala yousufzai for supporting educational rights. she's still recovering from that attack in a british hospital. >>> his film bringing the santa claus, the sandeman and easter bunny to life on the big screen. we're talk to the director of "the rise of the guardians." when you have diabetes... your doctor will say get smart about your weight. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. [ "the odd couple" theme playing ] humans. even when we cross our "t"s and dot our "i"s, we still run into problems -- mainly other humans. at liberty mutual insurance, we understand. that's why our auto p
to an education. >> i would get my education if it is in home, school, or any place. >> the taliban retaliated, hunting her down, shooting her in the neck, and back. the attack outraged even hardened pakistanis, and all around the world malala quickly became an international symbol of good against evil. today, she is recovering in england. number one, president barack oba obama. >> tonight you voted for action. not politics as usual. >> after a long, and we mean long and bitter campaign, president obama won re-election. in 2012, the president also won the supreme court stamp of approval for his health care reform program, and made history with this statement. >> i think same sex couples should be able to get married. ♪ >> as 2012 comes to a close, the president joined in grief with the community, shocked by senseless violence. >> these tragedies must end. and to end them we must change. >> brooke baldwin, cnn, atlanta. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the
squeeze investment thes in the next generation. education, infrastructure, research. there really needs to be a balance both between taxes and spending and then on the spending side between restraining discretionary spending and restraining entitlements which are aimed at today's seniors. >> so many times we've heard talk about generational warfare between old and young. but this is a little bit different. >> right. first of all, there is no -- today there is generational warfare more in the opposite direction. the polls show that young people by and large are willing to pay for entitlements for today's seniors. what's eroded is the willingness of today's senior ares to pay for social spending that benefits today's young people. the federal government today spends $7 per capita on seniors for every dollar it invests in kids. and the electoral paradox here is that democrats are winning overwhelming majorities over these nonwhite young people. 6 60% of white steeniors voted fo romney. and there's a risk over time if they're not restrained, they can squeeze out spending investment on young
molecular biology for a master's, but it's clear that he is scientific education did not go in vain. when i got my copy i went to the chapter that i would be able to judge vest on the energy environment or chapter 5 conservation and clean energy chaos. i happen to love the liberation myself, so i got a freebie in that title and i was pleased to see the tape on the creasy aspects of the environmental policy favored by progressives from those that don't work to ruechel or heads that his attitude and don't get you clean. and they pointed out some points about water conservation where if you were worried about water conservation you wouldn't be looking at the shower heads and toilets because most of the water that is used as industrial for energy use and irrigation and so forth and you have to get all the way down to the 1% level when you talk about the consumer use of water that he would be trying to knock that down by a percentage or so by going to the smaller toilets and showers. so i am hoping that one of the things that we also discuss is one of my pet peeves which is the willingness of pr
have to do this at schools. i say local education decisions are best made at the local level. >> reporter: independent senator joe lieberman says gun control needs to be on the table along with all other possible solutions, heather. heather: steve, how are democrats reacting to the in. ra proposal? >> reporter: predictably they don't buy it and like it one bit. some are predicting laperriere's stand will help their cause. >> i think he is so extreme and so tone deaf he actually helps the cause of us passing sensible gun legislation in the congress. >> we have 130,000 elementary and secondary schools in this country. if we have two officers in each that would cost $25 billion. where is that money going to come from? >> reporter: senator dianne feinstein planning to introduce a new ban on assault weapons when congress reconvenes next month. heather: steve centanni in washington. thank you, steve. >> reporter: you bet. gregg: one town agrees on the nr with the nra. altoona, alabama, making sure one of its four officers are at the elementary school during school days. town reside
gun training classes to educators. more than 50 people have signed up. teachers are not allowed to have guns on campuses there but an accu-weather lawmaker says he is writing a bill looking to give teachers that opportunity. >>> solano county sheriff's deputies say they believe a woman and her ex-boyfriend hid his father's body for two years ago so they could keep receiving pension benefits. his body was found in an apartment complex backyard in vallejo. deputies arrested his son and ex girlfriend earlier this week but since released. the district attorney has not yet filed charges pending further investigation. >>> a man accused of both sexually assaulting his patients and performing illegal cosmetic procedures has been ordered to stand trial. prosecutors say 49-year-old carlos guzman garza did not have a medical license when he conducted medical procedures including facelifts and liposuction at a clinic in san francisco's mission district. some of his patients also say they were sexually assaulted. he faces up to 30 years in prison if convicted on all counts. >>> a ban on a c
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)